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Covid-19: Rules for travel to and from France

We look at the rules for travellers between France and the UK, the US, Canada, Australia, EU countries and more

[This article is updated regularly to reflect new rules as they emerge; we advise also checking government sources prior to travel.]

Rules for France-UK and UK-France travel

France-UK 

The UK removed all travel restrictions, regardless of vaccination status, on March 18. Fully vaccinated travellers no longer need to complete a passenger locator form and as well as this, unvaccinated travellers are not required to carry out pre- or post-departure tests. 

UK-France 

There are no restrictions for fully vaccinated travellers. 

They must only:

  • Present proof of being fully vaccinated

Note that a person aged 18 and over must also get a booster dose within nine months of their last required dose to remain “fully vaccinated”. People who have already received a booster dose are considered fully vaccinated.

Unvaccinated travellers over the age of 12 must: 

  • Present the negative result of a PCR taken in the 72 hours before or an antigen test taken in the 48 hours before their journey begins, as stated on the French consulate website. Alternatively, they can show a certificate of recovery from Covid dating from the last six months

Children aged under 12 do not need to present a test or certificate of recovery.

France's domestic vaccine pass system has now come to an end. 

Read more: French vaccine pass and Covid mask rules to be removed from March 14

Rules for France-Canada and Canada-France travel 

France-Canada 

People considered fully vaccinated under Canada’s definition are able to enter Canada. 

Find out more about what you need through the Canadian government’s website here.

Non-fully vaccinated travellers going for tourism purposes are not allowed to enter Canada. 

There are a list of possible exceptions to this, including if you are travelling on compassionate grounds or for emergency medical reasons. You should check Canada’s government website for more information.  

Canada-France

There are no restrictions for fully vaccinated travellers. 

They must only:

  • Present proof of being fully vaccinated

The French government website states: "The same measures applied to vaccinated adults are applied to any minors who are travelling with them, whether vaccinated or not." 

Note that a person aged 18 and over must also get a booster dose within nine months of their last required dose to remain “fully vaccinated”. People who have already received a booster dose are considered fully vaccinated.

Unvaccinated travellers must: 

  • Present the negative result of a PCR taken in the 72 hours before or an antigen test taken in the 48 hours before their journey begins. Alternatively, they can show a certificate of recovery from Covid dating from the last six months

Children aged under 12 do not need to present a test or certificate of recovery.

Rules for France-US and US-France travel

France-US

Air passengers are no longer required to take a pre-departure Covid test before travelling to the US, although proof of vaccination is still required for most people.  

Please see here for more information on entering the US. 

US-France

The US advises against travel to France.

There are no restrictions for fully vaccinated travellers. 

They must only:

  • Present proof of being fully vaccinated

The French government website states: "The same measures applied to vaccinated adults are applied to any minors who are travelling with them, whether vaccinated or not." 

Note that a person aged 18 and over must also get a booster dose within nine months of their last required dose to remain “fully vaccinated”. People who have already received a booster dose are considered fully vaccinated.

Unvaccinated travellers must: 

  • Present the negative result of a PCR taken in the 72 hours before or an antigen test taken in the 48 hours before their journey begins. Alternatively, a certificate of recovery from Covid within the last six months can also be used. 

Children aged under 12 do not need to present a test or certificate of recovery.

Rules for travel from Australia or New Zealand to France

Australia-France

There are no restrictions for fully vaccinated travellers. 

They must only:

  • Present proof of being fully vaccinated
  • Sign a sworn statement (engagement sur l’honneur) confirming that they are not experiencing Covid symptoms and have not in the last 14 days been in contact with a confirmed Covid case. The statement also includes a promise to take a Covid test on arrival in France if required to by the travel authorities, but this would only be if you were asked. 

The French government website states: "The same measures applied to vaccinated adults are applied to any minors who are travelling with them, whether vaccinated or not." 

Note that a person aged 18 and over must also get a booster dose within nine months of their last required dose to remain “fully vaccinated”. People who have already received a booster dose are considered fully vaccinated.

Unvaccinated travellers must: 

  • Present their sworn statement (as above)
  • Be able to present an essential reason for travel 
  • Present the negative result of a PCR taken in the 72 hours before or an antigen test taken in the 48 hours before their journey begins

Children aged under 12 do not need to present a test and children over 12 who are accompanied by a fully vaccinated adult are exempt from the essential reasons rule.

New Zealand-France

All fully vaccinated travellers need to:

  • Present proof of being fully vaccinated

Note that a person aged 18 and over must also get a booster dose within nine months of their last required dose to remain “fully vaccinated”. People who have already received a booster dose are considered fully vaccinated.

Non-fully vaccinated travellers over 12 also need to:

  • Present the negative result of a PCR taken in the 72 hours before or an antigen test taken in the 48 hours before their journey begins. Alternatively, a certificate of recovery from Covid within the last six months can also be used. 

Children under 12 do not need to take a test.

Rules for travel between France and other EU countries 

EU country-France

Fully vaccinated people: The French government says that you can travel freely to France, but you must be able to present proof of your vaccination status. The EU states that travel between member states is open but advises that travellers check national rules. 

Non-fully vaccinated people: Must present proof of a negative PCR taken in the 72 hours before or an antigen test taken in the 48 hours before their journey begins. Alternatively, a certificate of recovery from Covid within the last six months can also be used. 

France-EU

Travel within the EU is possible from France on proof of either a negative PCR test, a document saying that you have had Covid and recovered, or that you are fully vaccinated.

A pan-EU digital Covid pass system is in place for mutual recognition of certificates, though individual countries may still have certain specific rules. 

It is advisable to check the French foreign affairs ministry's website for the latest information on entry to different EU countries from France.

Since February 1, a booster vaccine shot - received at most nine months after your second or only (in the case of Johnson & Johnson) vaccination - is required to maintain the validity of vaccination certificates in the digital EU Covid pass.

Read more: Booster Covid dose needed for travel within EU from February 1

What does it mean to be fully vaccinated?

The definition of “fully vaccinated” differs in France depending on whether referring to international travel rules or domestic vaccine pass rules. 

In the case of international travel, a person is considered fully vaccinated:

  • 28 after receiving a first dose of the Janssen vaccine
  • Seven days after receiving a second dose of the other vaccines recognised by the European Medicines Agency (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, AstraZeneca, Novavax)
  • Seven days after a booster dose of either Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna, if they have already received two doses of a vaccine approved by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Additionally, a person aged 18 and over considered fully vaccinated as laid out in the criteria above, must also get a booster dose within nine months of their last required dose to remain “fully vaccinated”. People who have already received a booster dose are considered fully vaccinated. 

It should be noted that a person considered fully vaccinated under France’s international travel rules may only be considered partially vaccinated under the domestic rules. 

People who have had a booster Covid dose are in almost every situation considered fully vaccinated under both definitions. 

Read more about the difference between France’s domestic and international definitions of fully vaccinated in our article here: ‘Fully vaccinated’: does meaning vary in France depending on context?

How do I prove my vaccination status?

An EU-wide system launched last year, enabling vaccination certificates to be verified throughout the bloc.

People travelling from the US can use their CDC card to prove their vaccination status, and people coming from the UK can use their NHS vaccination certificates.  

The Canadian government states that "Travellers fully vaccinated have to show a document to prove that they have received a vaccine recognized by the European Medicines Agency."

However, foreign vaccination certificates cannot generally be used as a vaccine pass once you have entered France.

Read more: US and other non-EU visitors to France: how to get a vaccine pass

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